Current Week

PART I – THEORY

WEEK ONE – INTRODUCTIONS

January 13thIntroduction to the Course/Communication history/Doing history in public

DUE BY NEXT CLASS: Select a domain name – we’re going to be signing you all up for Davidson Domains in class on Thursday.

January 15thDoing digital history/Davidson Domains/The ancestor of the blog

BEFORE MIDNIGHT ON JANUARY 18th: Fill out the CATME survey (you should have gotten an e-mail).  This will help me put you into teams for your group work.

 

WEEK TWO – DOING HISTORY – SECONDARY AND PRIMARY SOURCES

DUE AS FIRST BLOG POST (EVERYONE MUST POST BEFORE CLASS ON TUESDAY): Drawing on the descriptions of commonplace books in the Wulf article, write a blog post that simply highlights (and cites) passages of interest from the Fitzpatrick article, with brief (1-2 sentences) commentary on why you found them interesting.

January 20th – Approaches to the history of information/what is historiography?

 

PART II – COLONIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA

January 22nd –Geographic knowledge/digital approaches to primary sources

 

WEEK THREE

January 27thOverview of information technology in colonial America/deep (historical) reading

  •  Richard D. Brown.  “Early American Origins of the Information Age” in A Nation Transformed by Information
  • Review discussion of evaluating primary sources from Rampolla

January 29th Archives session/Introduction to Omeka – MEET IN THE ARCHIVE ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF THE LIBRARY

 

WEEK FOUR

February 3rd From physical to digital/doing research at Davidson – MEET IN THE FISHBOWL IN THE LIBRARY

February 5th– Political communiqués and colonialism/network analysis – MEET DURING COMMON HOUR IN CAROLINA INN 224

PA #1: In three short polished paragraphs outline three possible topics for your final paper.  You needn’t be specific at this stage but you should have a sense of what you’re broadly interested in and how you might approach it.  Due by 5:00 PM on FRIDAY February 6th

 

WEEK FIVE

February 10th Network analysis continued

February 12th Revolutionary propaganda/using science to do history

 

WEEK SIX

February 17th Colonial and Revolutionary America Presentations

  • Group A: Historiography
  • Group B: Primary source curation
  • Group C: Digital archive assessment
  • In preparation for PA#2 read section 5 of Rampolla, paying particular attention to the sections on moving from topics to historical questions.

 

PART III – THE EARLY REPUBLIC

February 19th – Controlling bodies through print/from source to data

PA #2: In 400 to 500 words, write a polished paragraph describing the subject of your final paper proposal.  This paragraph should include a snappy title, an announcement of the topic, two or three historical questions (see Rampolla for a discussion of what makes good historical question), a brief discussion of potential primary sources and a discussion of the form your project will take.  Due by MIDNIGHT on SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 22nd

 

WEEK SEVEN

February 24th Books, assimilation and Indian Territory /a trip to the printing press

February 26th Moving into the Industrial Age

 

WEEK EIGHT – SPRING BREAK (NO CLASS)

 

WEEK NINE

March 10thThe Business of information

  • JoAnne Yates.  “Business Use of Information and Technology During the Industrial Age” in A Nation Transformed by Information

March 12th Alternative spheres of information II/ African American Newspapers

To use in class:

For additional background: American Stories (on reserve in Little), chapters 10 and 11

WEEK TEN

March 17th Collapsing distance/mapping history

For additional background: American Stories (on reserve in Little), chapters 9 and 13

Before class on Tuesday, go back through our reading and pull out three “things” – e.g. events, people, newspapers – that have something geospatial associated with them (i.e. a letter written in a particular place).  Create metadata for those items in the Google table here .  We will use this information in class – it is required for participation. (Our map)

For use in class only:

 

March 19th Presentations on the Early Republic

  •      Group B: Historiography
  •      Group C: Primary source curation
  •      Group A: Digital Archives assessment
  •      In preparation for PA #3-#6, review sections 4 and 7 of Rampolla.
  • NOTE: Early Republic written assignments due by SUNDAY, MARCH 22nd at MIDNIGHT

 

PA #3: Write an analysis of one primary source for your final project. Due by MIDNIGHT on SUNDAY, MARCH 22nd

PART IV – ANTEBELLUM AMERICA

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WEEK ELEVEN

March 24thThe press moves west/mapping news over time

For additional background: American Stories (on reserve in Little), chapters 10 and 11

For use in class only:

March 26th New technologies: Telegraph

 

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WEEK TWELVE

March 31stNew technologies: Photography

For use in class only:

April 2nd Cultural critique/bringing the class to bear on the past – NO CLASS

  • Pierre Sorlin.  “How to Look at an “Historical” Film
  • Pick a film or television program that has, as its subject, something technological and antebellum (for the purposes of this exercise, colonial era to the Civil War).  Before the normal END OF CLASS (4:20 pm) post a blog post discussing the film/tv episode you chose in light both of what you’ve learned in this class and in light of the Sorlin reading.  You MUST cite a colleague (likely an earlier post) and you MUST cite Sorlin.
[wpanchor id=”week_13″] WEEK THIRTEEN

April 7th –  EASTER BREAK – NO CLASS

April 9thTransnational news in the antebellum era

PA #4: Historiography Review. (750 to 1000 words) Write an essay in which you explore the scholarship that has been done on your chosen research proposal topic. Place the writings of different scholars in conversation with each other and to your historical question. Be sure to articulate a clear argument for what you see as successful or unsuccessful approaches to the topic.  Remember, this will be a part of your final project, and should be written for an informed but not expert audience. Due at 5 pm on FRIDAY, April 10th.
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WEEK FOURTEEN

April 14th – Project design

  • BEFORE CLASS – find a digital project that is similar (in form, rather than content) to what you would like to do for the final project for this class.  Be prepared to discuss what you like/would like to mimic about it.

April 16th –Military technology

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WEEK FIFTEEN

April 21st

Letters and other affective technologies of Civil War death/a return to mapping

April 23rd Antebellum America presentations

  •      Group C: Historiography
  •      Group A: Primary source curation
  •      Group B: Digital archives assessment

PART V – WRAPPING UP
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WEEK SIXTEEN – FINAL PROJECT WORK

Rough Draft  Complete a rough draft or detailed outline of your final project. DRAFT Due at 5 pm on MONDAY, APRIL 27th.  

 

April 28th – NO CLASS – Schedule a meeting with me to talk about your draft sometime on TUESDAY APRIL 28th, OR WEDNESDAY APRIL 29th

April 30thStates of the Field

WEEK SEVENTEEN

May 5th – Final Presentations and Pizza

PA #5: Rough Draft/Peer Review/beta testing.  First, complete a rough draft or detailed outline of your final project.Then, come up with a list of questions you’d like answered about your project (i.e. did you like the way X feature worked?  What did you think about the argument? – NOT just “did you like it?”)  Look at these guidelines for designing beta tests if you need help with this step.

Then find three different colleagues, family members, friends who are NOT in the class, show them your project or project plan, and solicit comments.

Write up your questions, your reviewers’ thoughts, and your thoughts about their comments as a public blog post.

Also be prepared to discuss those comments in class. PEER REVIEW Due at 5 pm on WEDNESDAY, MAY 6th

 

FINAL PROJECTS DUE BY THE END OF FINALS WEEK – URL for your project posted to the PUBLIC course writing site